The CEOs Top 5 Priorities: WSJ – November 22, 2010

The CEOs Top 5 Priorities: WSJ – November 22, 2010

Below are the five priorities from the full article posted (see URL link below) from the WSJ’s CEO conference on Monday. If you are so inclined, send off a letter in response to the five priorities: email, fax and address are included.

Fax: 609.520.7767 Email:reports@wsj.com

Your Address

November 22, 2010

Lawrence Rout The Wall Street Journal 4300 1 North South Brunswick N.J. 08852 Re: The CEOs Top Responsibilities The Wall Street Journal – CEO Council

Dear Mr. Rout,

Below are the five priorities from the council meeting that was held by the CEO’s who attended the conference and who were assigned to be on the task force. This information is in the printed version of the Journal Report of the CEO Council on Monday, …

What is it going to take to motivate our leadership to invest in enriching…

…the lives of those in our workplace environments?

How will our leaders begin to earn the trust of their workers again? How will our leaders truly thank the workers for staying the course? How will our leaders start doing what they say they will do?

How will their voice be heard by the five generations in the work force today? How will the leadership begin to reach the over-extended and average performer? And what programs are designed for the high potential workers? Are there actually under-performing workers left in the workplace today? Will we address the elephant in the room that all business is personal and yes that it is emotional?

What are the concerns these employees have? How can our leadership address their concerns? What are the leaders concerns? …

Will the student loan debt become our next mortgage crisis?

Will the student loan debt become our next mortgage crisis?

Program Integrity; “Gainful Employment” proposed rule AGENCY: Office of Postsecondary Education, Department of Education.

ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking.

SUMMARY: The Secretary proposes to amend the Student Assistance General Provisions to establish measures for determining whether certain postsecondary educational programs lead to gainful employment in recognized occupations, and the conditions under which these educational programs remain eligible for the student financial assistance programs authorized under title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended (HEA). http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/proprule/2010-3/072610a.html http://www.regulations.gov/search/Regs/home.html#home

In the Wall Street Journal the week of September 20, 2010 Corinthian Colleges, Inc. | www.cci.edu has taken out full page advertisements daily regarding the proposed rule for “Gainful Employment” which provides provisions to establish measures on postsecondary …

Radical, A Portrait of Saul Alinsky by Nicholas Von Hoffman

There has been mention of Saul Alinsky’s book Rules for Radicals (1971) recently in the Press these days, partly due to Nicholas Von Hoffman’s release of his new book, Radical, A Portrait of Saul Alinsky (2010). Mostly Von Hoffman’s book pays homage to the man he admired, yet there has been much ado about Alinsky and urban community service projects linked to current political figures.

The view point of Saul Alinsky could be viewed as a mind-set described in the management article by Gosling and Mintzberg, The Five Minds of a Manager (2003). Saul Alinsky was a tough guy on the outside yet reflective in his leadership style for the common good.

Based on Mintzberg’s research and reflecting on Goslings and Mintzberg’s, The Five Minds of a Manager article …

What, Me Study? The Five-Year Party

What, Me Study? The Five-Year Party (2010)

By Craig Brandon

In the Wall Street Journal, Bookshelf review by Melanie Kirkpatrick, August 08, 2010, Melanie reviews the book What, Me Study? The Five-Year Party. By Craig Brandon. Thank you Craig for writing this book! Thank you Melanie for great review.

Without a question of a doubt, obtaining any type of degree program at a community college, or an undergraduate university in the U.S., could be considered a ‘party’. It is very true in the early years, going away to college and leaving home for the first time was a social experience and was part of the learning process and rites of passage in obtaining your degree. Unfortunately as the book review goes on to discuss, parties, socialization are the focus with …

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